Spinning With: Silk Noil and US Grade A Top

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Hello, today I am sharing moreĀ of my spinning fibres experiments. This time they are more experimental materials for me. I have no clue what I could or will use the silk noil for. I think I will probably weave with it, but made into what I am still unsure of. I would also have to spin a lot to be able to weave anything worthwhile with it. The other material is a blend, it is sold as US Grade A Top and I only bought one half pound bag. I like the blend but I am afraid I won’t have enough for any large projects, so perhaps socks. But enough about what I am thinking about making out of the wools and more about their qualities and what it was like to spin with them.

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Spinning With: Merino-Silk, Flax, and Corn Silk

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Hello everyone today is the second installment of fibres used for spinning yarn. As I mentioned in the first installment the store where I was buying my fibres is closing and were having a sale, so I took advantage of it and bought many different experimental fibres just to see how each behaved, felt (texture wise not felting wise), and what quality of yarn they produced. This post I am taking a closer look at some cellulose fibres, which were missing from the first post, as well as one blended fibre. I experimented spinning with flax/linen, corn silk (one of the more experimental ones that I decided to try), and a merino-silk blend.

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Spinning With: Merino, Alpaca, and Angora Wools

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Hello everyone, today I am sharing with you my experiences with hand-spinning different fibres materials. I am relatively new at spinning yarn, however in the short amount of time that I have been spinning (since the end of April) I feel that I have spun a reasonable amount of yarn and have gotten a feel for how it is done and I have started experimenting with different types of wool and taking note of the differences. Also it helps that the store where you can buy the most varieties of wool in my city is closing and everything is 30% off. Needless to say I went a bit crazy and have been experimenting ever since, I digress. Today I am focusing on what it is like to spin three different types of wool: Merino, Alpaca, and Angora.

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